PATH Parent to Parent/Family Voices of Connecticut is a network of families providing informational and emotional support to others who have a child with developmental or health related needs. PATH/FVCT reaches out to help strengthen families coping with similar situations in Connecticut, and the organizations that serve them to reduce isolation, empower families as advocates for their children and reaffirm their values as parents and caregivers.

Not Just Along For The Ride: Families Are The Engine That Drives Pediatric Home Health Care

Families of children and youth with special health care needs and disabilities are the engine that drives home- and community-based services for their children. They are not passive observers in the pediatric health care system; they become specialists in medical care, advocacy, and public health, uniquely qualified through their lived experience of providing care across multiple systems to their child—a “certification” only they can hold.

I know because I was the mom, primary caregiver, chief communicator, and care coordinator for one of my daughters, Justice Hope, before she died at the age of 11. Justice was born with congenital anomalies that did not tie up neatly into one overarching diagnosis but that led to multiple disabilities and many complex medical needs requiring technology, home health, and numerous interventions throughout her life.

 

More

How to Have a Successful PPT (Planning and Placement Team) Meeting

Parents: Homework is the key to a successful Planning and Placement Team (PPT) meeting.  If you do your homework properly, you will come to the meeting fully prepared and ready to do business.  You will feel empowered and you will become a better advocate for your child.

School Records

This is one of the most important things you can do to prepare for a PPT meeting: get a copy of your child’s school records. And read them.

More

Spotlight on CT KASA Youth Coordinator, Emily Ball

We sat down with CT KASA Youth Coordinator Emily Ball to tell us more about her experience with KASA.

1) How did you hear about CT KASA and what made you think about joining?

I initially was involved in KASA since 2005 at the age of 13. I had heard about the organization originally through a friend of mine. The original KASA disbanded in 2013. I learned of the new group in 2015 through Nanfi Lubogo. Originally, I would say because my parents thought it was a good idea, but more recently because I missed being involved with such an empowering organization and was happy for the opportunity.

More